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Author Topic: Results from Adult Offspring Survey  (Read 3839 times)
dadams
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« on: November 11, 2008, 11:54:34 PM »

This was done in the US but involved 85 adult offspring from around the world.
Interesting results.


This is a study by Dr. Patricia Mahlstedt and Kathleen LaBounty about the attitudes of adults conceived through sperm donation.  The abstract was presented via poster board this weekend at the ASRM meeting.  In addition, it was one out of 32 studies to be chosen as part of a press release.
 
The highlights are that most of the participants viewed the man who provided sperm as a biological father (versus donor), most had searched for him, and most believed that the donor's name should be on the birth certificate in some manner.  Feelings about being donor conceived was evenly distributed from very good to very bad.  Most would not be egg/sperm donors themselves or use it to conceive.  Out of the sample, 12.9% felt that sperm donation shouldn't be practiced at all, 1.2% supported only anonymous donations, 3.5% supported donors who provide some non-identifying information, 57.7% supported only donors who would release identifying information to offspring of any age, and 24.7% believed that donors who provide indepth nonidentifying information is acceptable.

While only 1.2% of our participants had identifying information about their donors, 35.7% wanted to meet him once, 26.2% wanted to establish a relationship, 25.0% wanted identifying information, 11.9% only nonidentifying information, and 1.2% didn't want anything.

They found significant correlations, too, between how donor-conceived people feel about their conception and how they view their donor, how they rate their relationships with their mothers, and how they perceive their mother's mental health.  (Interestingly, perceptions of relationships and mental health of fathers was not significant. )
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Quinny
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2008, 02:03:12 AM »

Thanks for the summary of the results Damian. Is there somewhere that shows us the detailed results or was that all that was published?

I only vaguely remember this survey so I don't know what answers I selected. Smiley
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Donor conceived adult from Perth, Western Australia. Searching for a donor who donated to Dr Colin Douglas-Smith in 1976.
dadams
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2008, 03:13:23 AM »

Hi Adam

they are in the process of submitting it to be published. Being published in research usually takes a little while so it may be bit of a wait until we see it in a journal.

I just clarrified something with the person who sent me this info. In those groups of data - they should all add up to 100%. So if the groups of "meet once", "establish a relationship" and "only find out identifying info" are put together (because the first two scenarios entail knowing identifying info) then 87% believe they should know the identity of this man.
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Hursty
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« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2008, 10:19:47 PM »

Hey there.
What I find interesting is that to adopt the mental health of the mother and the father are very thoroughly investigated and many are knocked back - Hello?Huh
Just walk in off the street and get egg/sperm "donation"!!!! Oh the woes of before and after conceptions!!!! The end result is the same - A HUMAN BEING IS CREATED.
 Angry
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bundygrrrl
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2010, 11:33:36 AM »

Hey hursty!

I think what they meant by the mental health was similar to the first forum I attended in NSW with approx 21 DC teen/adults.

We were discussing how the process of DC can affect the parent's emotional health, from the perspective of the secrecy, guilt, and social aspects like telling, and the stress behind how to disclose IF they decide to etc. The risk of being "discovered and outed" that was drilled into them back in the late 70's, early 80's.

There was a number of recipient bio mothers that had experienced depression and other mental illnesses post conception, and during the years they were growing up, and quite possibly just prior to disclosure...
I am aware that this is not necessarily directly caused by DC, but I'm sure it held a part in th trigger.

To want to protect your partner, aswell as your child must be a very tough dilemma to go through. And socially, man's fertility is a significant part of his "masculinity", (which is for some reason waaay more devastating and less socially acceptable than a woman's loss of fertility)

And then I believe there was the concern of mental illnesses being genetically passed on.. Which is why there was not such a focus on the dads.

I hope this clarifies a little x
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